T-SQL Tuesday #59 – My Hero

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “My Hero”. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Tracy McKibben (Blog | @RealSQLGuy).



 
Everybody needs a hero. Ever kid needs a champion. Someone you look up to. It doesn’t matter if you’re young or old, everybody needs that. If you don’t have a hero to look up to, it’s hard to dream big.

 
The unsung heroes
Not all heroes are out there like we expect them to be. There are some heroes that like to stay below the radar. But does that make them any less of a hero than a hero that is really out there? I don’t think so. But defining a hero is much easier when it’s a person that is well known by the community.

If you take one of the most known people out there, for example Thomas LaRock (Blog | @SQLRockstar), Brent Ozar (Blog | @BrentO), or Grant Fritchey (Blog | @GFritchey). Do you define those people as heroes? I know I do. They make an effort for the community, help people wherever they can, and they are working to make us all better SQL Server Professionals. But they are out there, and are widely acknowledged as heroes by many people. So defining those people as heroes, even though they are, is easy. It’s praising the unsung heroes that is hard.

 

 
The fallen heroes
There’s a well known saying that says: “All that glitters is not gold”. And that also goes for the heroes in the community. In the end, they are just people like you and me. They have good and bad character traits like everyone else. But some heroes turn villain in the end. They use their fame to get what they want, or mistreat other people for not being the hero they are. Unfortunately I know a few of those “heroes” as well…

But does mistreating people make that hero a little less of a hero? I think it does. Even heroes can fall of their pedestal. And even though people find you a hero, you can’t mistreat other people, or tell them they’re less than you. If you’re the hero, it’s your mission to lead other people to victory. Not to put them down, and convince them they can’t do something.

 

 
Become a hero
A hero can come in many shapes and sizes. And you don’t become a hero overnight (even though that would make things easier sometimes). It takes a lot of effort to become a hero, and to be seen as the hero. And you know what? They make it look so easy, and that’s their strength and weakness at the same time.

So when are you becoming a hero? What are your plans to become a hero? What steps do you need to take now, in a week, in a month, or even in a year? You can’t become a hero you say? Yes you can! Everybody can become a hero! Just try it, by giving back to the community. Answer questions on forums, write blogs, start presenting, anything is possible!

Are you the next hero Gotham needs…?

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family and community – RECAP

Last week I had the privilege to host this months T-SQL Tuesday blog party. The subject was SQL Family and community, and a lot of people participated. There were a lot of great blog posts, and I wanted to make a complete list for you that contains all the blog posts of this month:

 
Warwick Rudd (Blog | @Warwick_Rudd) posted: SQL Family and community

Boris Hristov (Blog | @BorisHristov) posted: SQL Family and SQLHangouts

Cathrine Wilhelmsen (Blog | @cathrinew) posted: #SQLFamily – Pay It Forward

Mickey Stuewe (Blog | @SQLMickey) posted: SQL Family to the Rescue of a Local Community

Chris Yates (Blog | @YatesSQL) posted: SQL Family and Community

Ed Watson (Blog | @SQLGator) posted: SQL Family and Tripping the Light Fantastique

Aaron Bertrand (Blog | @AaronBertrand) posted: A SQL _VARIANT Use Case (No Pun Intended)

Jason Brimhall (Blog | @sqlrnnr) posted: SQL Family and
Community

Adam Mikolaj (Blog | @SqlSandwiches) posted: SQL Family and community

Glenda Gable (Blog | @ggable313) posted: TSQL Tuesdays # 57

Andy Yun (Blog | @SQLBek) posted: A #SQLFamily Story

Wayne Sheffield (Blog | @DBAWayne) posted: SQL Family and Community

Steve Jones (Blog | @way0utwest) posted: SQL Family and Community

Kenneth Fisher (Blog | @sqlstudent144) posted: SQL Family

Rob Farley (Blog | @rob_farley) posted: Nepotism In The SQL Family

Ricardo Leka (Blog | @BigLeka) posted: SQL Family and community

Jeffrey Verheul (Blog | @DevJef) posted: SQL Family and community

 
I want to thank all participants for their beautiful posts for T-SQL Tuesday. And thank you Adam, for allowing me to host this month!

If I missed your post, please let me know, and I’ll add it to this post.

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family and community

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “SQLFamily and community”. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Jeffrey Verheul (Blog | @DevJef).



 
This months topic is SQL Family and community. The reason I chose this topic is the great SQL Server community. As I mentioned in my opening post, at first I didn’t know what to expect from the community, when I first started working with SQL Server. But it didn’t take long to notice the reason why everyone was to enthusiastic about it. They say the SQL Server community is friendlier and more helpful than all other communities. But it is?

It’s all about helping
A few years back, I attended a developer conference in the Netherlands called TechDays. One of the session I got to see was a session about spatial data by Bob Beauchemin (Blog | @bobbeauch). And yes, here is where the obsession for spatial data started I think. After the conference I started to play around with spatial data, and eventually I ran into a problem. At that moment I couldn’t find any useful resources online, and I knew Bob would know the answer.

After thinking about it a day or 2, I finally decided to mail Bob. This was a big step for me, because I was about to email one of the people I highly respect and look up to. The expectancy wasn’t too high, because he couldn’t possibly have the time to answer my stupid email. So I took the bull by the horns anyway and pressed send.. But to my surprise, it didn’t even take an hour before I received an answer. From Bob. THE Bob. I couldn’t believe it! The big Bob Beauchemin took the time to not only read my email, but even provide me with an answer to my question. And of course the answer was spot on, and precisely I needed to overcome my problem.

After that, I regularly emailed Bob about questions, interesting cases I came across, and many more things. But I didn’t send him an email for too long now, and I still hope I get to thank him for this in person one day. But this is where the community-vibe hit me.

 
From knowledge base to blog
When you get to work on all different kinds of projects, you end up with notepad files all over your desktop, USB hard drives, etc. At least, in my case that’s where it started. In order to create a structure in all these small solutions and notes, I decided to put them online. So basically I wanted to create a small knowledge base and one location where I could save scripts for myself, that I wrote before and might need in the future again. But after a few months, people started to thank me for my posts. I couldn’t understand why, because the posts were so basic, and sometimes totally gibberish in my opinion.

But after a while, I started to like the “blogging” (which was just brain-dumping until then). The blog posts became more coherent, written for a broader audience, and they were easier to follow and implement for readers. So the brain dumps grew into something new: useful information that other people could actually use! One of the things I’m most proud of until now is the spatial data series I wrote (yes, again spatial data). It grew from just 1 post (the basics of spatial data) to a series of 11 posts where I guide readers from the basics to building their own reports. This series was inspired by readers and colleagues that asked questions, and questions I had myself.

 
Online community
One of the greatest discoveries for me was the community on Twitter. Anyone you can imagine from the community is on Twitter, and available within a few clicks. And they all take the time to answer questions! This came as a big surprise to me at first. There are so much interesting people you can follow, interact with, and that can help you with technical challenges you have. In most cases, when you post a question with the hashtag #SQLHelp, you’ll get an answer within minutes. And you answer could come from anybody: An MCM from the UK, MVP from Australia, DBA from the US, a BI guy from South Africa, etc. All kinds of people with different skill sets and technical interests. And the variety of people make it worth while to follow and interact with them.

 
When strangers become friends
After being “active” in the community for a while, I started talking to some people of the SQL Server community online. At one moment I asked one of them to review a blog post, to see what she thought. That was the start of a friendship that brought me a lot the last couple of years. She introduced me to some other SQL Server professionals, that I consider close friends now. These friends support me, push me to do stuff when I need it, and help me in any way possible. They inspire me to do better, and take the extra step to achieve the goals I set myself. They are there when I need them, and that is the most important thing. And all of that because of SQL Family and the community! The community that I couldn’t believe to be more than a bunch of people with the same job and technical interests.

 
FORG
Being involved in the community is really cool, and there are benefits of that. For example, Red Gate gave me the opportunity to become a member of the Friends of Red Gate program, which was and is a great honor for me. I’ve loved using their tools for years, and now they gave me the opportunity to help make these tools better, by being part of this program. And hopefully there are a lot of cool things coming up, because I still have a lot of dreams and goals I set myself when I became a part of this program.

 
If you’re not involved yet, get involved!
The reason you should get involved in the community, is the fact that it’s really nice to help people, and you get so much in return. Getting help from someone is great, but helping other people makes you feel even better. At least, that’s my experience. So if you’re not already involved, start visiting local events like SQL Saturdays or online events like virtual users groups. It’ll give you insight in other SQL Server subjects, and show you that other people struggle with the same problems you do!

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family and community

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

 
This month I’ll be the T-SQL Tuesday host, and I’m really honored! Thanks Adam, for this opportunity!

 
The topic
This month I would like to give everyone the opportunity to write about SQL Family. The first time I heard of SQL Family, was on Twitter where someone mentioned this. At first I didn’t know what to think about this. I wasn’t really active in the community, and I thought it was a little weird. They were just people you meet on the internet, and might meet in person at a conference some day. But I couldn’t be more wrong about that!

Once you start visiting events, forums, or any other involvement with the community, you’ll see I was totally wrong. I want to hear those stories. How do you feel about SQL Family? Did they help you, or did you help someone in the SQL Family? I would love to hear the stories of support, how it helped you grow and evolve, or how you would explain SQL Family to your friends and family (which I find hard). Just write about whatever topic you want, as long as it’s related to SQL Family or community.

 
The rules
- Your post must be published between 00:00:00 UTC and 23:59:59 UTC on Tuesday 12th of August
- Include the T-SQL Tuesday logo in the top of your post, and your post must link back to this one (trackback and comments are moderated, so it might take some time before they’re visible) or tweet about it using the hashtag #TSQL2sDay
- If you like this, check Steve Jones’ (Blog | @way0utwest) blog post that contains the list of topics, and contact Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic) if you’d like to host

T-SQL Tuesday #56 – Assumptions

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “Assumptions “. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Dev Nambi (Blog | @DevNambi).



 
This months topic is about assumptions. A few years back, I worked in a team that consisted of mainly .NET developers. Every time we mentioned “I think so…”, “I assume it works like this…” or “I think we should…”, one of them used the quote: “Assumption is the mother of all f*ck ups!”, which is a quote from the movie Under Siege 2: Dark Territory. But he was right. The moment you assume something, it’s going to blow up in your face in the end.

 
I tested it, and it works
Working for larger organizations should mean they are more prepared to certain things then smaller organizations. But I’ve seen large organization being badly prepared, or just plain unprepared. They assume their processes work, or they will never encounter failure at all.

One of the companies I worked for, took backups every night. Full backups. Of databases there were between 100 GB and 500+ GB… And they never tested a restore… Why? They used the default maintenance functionality with “Verify Backup Integrity” enabled, and they never needed to restore a database before. So they only took backups because management wanted that. They didn’t understand why, because their processes never failed, and would never fail in the future.

But one day, it wasn’t their processes that failed. A LUN went offline during the ETL process, and SQL Server naturally detected that. SQL Server put a database into suspect mode, because of database corruption. But because there were no backups, they needed to move to plan B: process about 2+ years of data (stored in XML files) again.

Eventually I solved it and recovered the database without the need of a restore, but it scared them. They now saw why they needed backups, and why they needed to test the restore on a regular basis. But they forgot about it after a few days, and we never got the time to change the maintenance processes or test any restore. After that, I made the best choice possible in my opinion: I found myself a new challenge.

 
If you don’t know what you’re talking about…
Another example of assumption I have seen a lot over the years, is people explaining stuff to other people, without any proper knowledge about a certain subject. I can recall a conversation between me and an intern. He was a .NET developer, and had some questions about how a T-SQL feature worked. Another junior BI developer started laughing, when the intern asked his question. “What a stupid question, everybody knows the answer to that!” he said. Kind of irritated by that, I asked him to provide the answer to that question. He didn’t want to. I asked him again: “you answer the question, because you laughed about it, and I want to hear the answer from you.”

He started to stutter, and he explained the functionality all wrong. When I explained it the right way, the .NET intern thanked me, and walked away with his new knowledge, ready to bring it into practice. The BI developer wanted to continue the discussion. “You’re all wrong! That feature doesn’t work that way!”. I nicely told him, that I used this feature on a daily basis, and that he was wrong. The discussion went on a little more, but I stopped the discussion by telling him: “I’m doing this for a number of years now, and working with SQL Server is what I do. You just started, and wrote your first query a few months ago. If you find any resources that show me being wrong, I’ll be happy to quit my job. Until then, please don’t explain T-SQL to other people if you don’t know what you’re talking about.”. Until this day, he never got back to me on this discussion.

 
I don’t need to check that!
Another great assumption you’ll see in several companies, are IT people that trust their own automation a little bit too much. The rule in IT is that if you need to do something more than once or a couple of times, you need to automate it. Automation is a good thing, and it can save you time. But who checks if your process doesn’t fail? You don’t want to build a system, that checks another system for you. One of the things I’ve seen is a developer that created an automated process, that checked a log table on a database server, and mailed new errors to the developer. Looking at this, it’s a perfect solution. You don’t have to monitor the log table by yourself, but an automated process does that for you.

At one moment, an application seemed to fail. It threw exceptions, and the end-users weren’t able to do anything with the application. The developer was called, and he told the users to contact the system administrator, because it must have been a server- or hardware problem. The system administrator called the developer after a few minutes, and told him the server and hardware were in perfect condition. The developer insisted his software wasn’t failing, because he didn’t receive any errors by email. But after a quick check, the developer came to the conclusion his automated process failed. The developer lost a lot of credits because of this attitude. As you see, this is another example of an assumption that went wrong.

 
Never stop asking questions
One of the most important things I wanted to show you with this blog post, is that if you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t be afraid to ask someone. The same goes for processes, tools, functionality, or any other question you want to ask. If people mock you for asking questions, they are the ones that are wrong. You’re just trying to learn and grow, so don’t feel bad about yourself!

T-SQL Tuesday #54 – An Interview Invitation

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “An Interview Invitation “. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Boris Hristov (Blog | @BorisHristov).



 
This months topic is about job interviews. Looking back, I can say I had a few interview over the last few years. Not only to get myself at a company, but also to hire new employees for the companies I worked for. Both types of conversations can be very interesting, or get on your nerves very quickly. I’ve seen both…

 
Hiring people
When you work for a company, and you hire new people, you want to make sure you’re talking to the right type of people. Whether or not I’m hiring you, isn’t just bases on technical skills. The way I see it is that technical skills is mostly build from experience and insight, and knowledge can be build up by reading a book, watching a video, or talking to and learning from other people with a similar skill set. The thing I’m personally looking at in the interview is personality, passion for what a person does, and what he or she wants to achieve in the next few years. That will tell you something about the person. I’m not saying the technical skills aren’t that important, but it’s not the only thing I look for. One of the last companies I worked for looks for people they want to drink a beer with on a Friday night. So again, the personality is in some cases as important as technical skills.

 
Interviewing people
Talking to other database professionals can be either very interesting, or very frustrating. One of the interviews I had in the past few years, was to hire a new colleague for a project I was working on. His resume looked good, he had a few years experience on equal projects, and I thought he would make a good addition to the team. When I started the interview, he seemed to be a little nervous. I tried to make him feel a little more comfortable, by asking him about his experience, past projects, and personal life. When he calmed down, we slowly moved the conversation to his technical skills.

Talking about the project, I started to notice he wasn’t giving me the answer I would’ve expected from someone with his experience. Okay, maybe he misunderstood the project. We moved on to common issues we all ran into when working on projects. Every question was answered by “it depends…”, and “I’ve read that…”. Okay, that’s no good. Theoretical knowledge isn’t what I expected. And not long after that, I ended the interview. If you’re too scared to even make a theoretical decision, and defend that point of view, I don’t want you to work on my environment. That shows me that if you make a mistake, and that can happened to even the most experienced employee, you won’t have the guts to tell me you did something wrong. And I want you to tell me that, so we can solve it together, and learn from it.

Another interview I had with a database professional, turned out to be a dull conversation. The person came in to apply for a senior function, and he definitely had the experience for it. His personality was good, and would fit the team perfectly. But every answer we asked him, he answered with a lot of needless words, that ended up in a best-practice answer. The reason I didn’t want to hire him, was his lack of creativity. If you’re spilling answers you read on the internet, or in books, it shows me you’re probably not creative enough to solve the problems you’re encountering. If you’re in a stressful situation, and you need to read a book to think of a solution to the problem, you’re probably not the DBA I’m looking for.

 
Being interviewed
One of the most interesting interviews I had in the last few years, was one of my last job interviews. The first interview went well, where we talked about the company, the team, etc. The IT manager and team leader wanted to talk to me a second time, and that was the most interesting interview I had until now.

The interview started out nice. I talked to the team leader again, and another team member joined the interview. We had a good conversation about technical stuff, the team, projects, etc. When we were approaching the end of the interview, the most interesting part started. I knew the company worked with a consultant company from England, and that the lead consultant visited the office every few weeks. Big surprise, he was there that day. So the moment he walked in, I started to struggle. I needed to switch from my native language Dutch to English, and started an interview with an MCM and MVP. This made me even more nervous, and because of that I stared to doubt every answer I gave. But in the end, I did a reasonable job apparently, because the company hired me. Now I see him every month, and we have some good conversations, even though I’m still afraid to ask him a question sometimes, worrying I’m just asking a dumb question.

 
Maybe the most annoying person is the perfect candidate…
Thinking about hiring a new colleague, you might end up with a pretty big dilemma. The person you want to hire because of his personality, might not be the best choice. The one with the best technical skills might be a better fit, but you don’t like him at all. So when looking for a new colleague or team member, you might end up wondering what’s best for the company, and set your own feelings aside. But when you do, it’s always a gamble with new people. At first, the new colleague had perfect technical skills and was very nice, but in the end his skills aren’t that good or his personality is slightly different than you thought. Hiring people is still a combination of asking the right questions and a gut feeling.

T-SQL Tuesday #51 – Place Your Bets

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “Place Your Bets”. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Jason Brimhall (Blog | @sqlrnnr).



 
When I read about this months T-SQL Tuesday topic, the first thing that came to mind was things that you know will go wrong sooner or later. When you encounter a situation like this, you immediately know this can’t last forever. You want to fix it when you see it, but there’s no money, or there’s no time at that moment. But they promise you, in a few weeks you can take all the time you need. Well, that’ll never happen. Until things go wrong, and you can clean up the mess. Sounds familiar? Yes, we’ve all seen this, or will see this sooner or later.

 
With power comes great responsibility
Just imagine this with me. One of your colleagues asks you to look at a problem he’s having with a script someone in your company wrote. You probably solved it while he was standing right next to you. He watches you solve the problem, and when it’s solved, he walks away with a thousand-yard stare in his eyes. You don’t really think about it when it happens, but it’ll come to you…

A few weeks later, it’s 10 AM and you’re still having your first coffee of the day, the same developer asks you to look at “his script”. Wait, what?! Yes, he watched you work your magic, and that funny language of “Es-Que-El” seemed easy to learn. So he bought himself a “SQL Server for dummies”, learned all he needs to know in only a weekend, and wonders why it took you so long to learn it. From now on, he can write his own scripts, so he doesn’t need you anymore. Except for this last time.

Opening the script scares you: it’s a cursor. But in your frustration and amazement you “fix” the broken script, by refactoring his select statement in the cursor. Because the cursor only collects data, you add a “TOP 10″ clause in the select statement, and run the script as test. Nice, it finishes is 25 seconds. “It will only consume 500 rows” is the last thing you heard him say. You send the guy off, so you can continue your own work.

Later in the day, it’s about 4 PM, you meet the same guy at the coffee machine. He starts a discussion about how he needs a new PC, because the script YOU wrote is slow (see where this is going…?). It’s running for about 4 hours now, while it should only collect about 500 records. I know what you think: that’s impossible. You walk with him to his desk, stop the script, and look at his code. That isn’t the query you looked at this morning. Asking your colleague about it explains it all: he “slightly refactored” the script, because he didn’t need al those weird statements to get him his results. Well, after a fiery discussion of a few minutes, you explain him the DOES need the “FETCH NEXT” in the query, because the query now ran the same statement for only the first record in the select statement you declared for your cursor.

So this funny “Es-Que-El” language, isn’t that easy to learn. A beautiful quote about that, and I’m not sure who said that, says: “T-SQL is easy to learn, but hard to master”. So putting your money on one horse, in this case buying yourself a book, isn’t a good idea.

 
Putting your money on one color
Another great example is a company that had a wonderful Business Intelligence environment. They used the whole nine yards: SQL Server, SSIS, SSAS, SSRS, etc. The downside of that you ask? It was all hosted on 1 physical machine, on a single SQL Server instance. Oh, and it was running low on disk space, and there was no room in the chassis to put in extra disks. That’s right: it was like juggling burning chainsaws with only one hand. Or an interesting challenge, if you will.

Eventually we hosted a few databases on NAS volumes. At that point, I was told the databases we moved were less important. Pro tip: never EVER trust them when they say that!!! They forgot to tell me the biggest database of the moved databases wasn’t in the backup plan (500 GB database takes a long time to backup), and the last backup was made over a year ago. Surprise, one night the network card failed for maybe only a microsecond, and SQL Server thought the LUN was offline or the disk crashed. So SQL Server said that the database was corrupt, and that the datafiles were unavailable. After a few hours, a reboot of the server fixed it, and SQL Server could see the disk volumes again. So the database was saved after all.

But you see where I’m going with this? You never know when things go wrong, and putting all your money on one color when playing roulette isn’t the best idea. If the hardware of your single server fails, you fail.

 
Next, Next, Finish?
But the biggest example I can give you of a bad placed bet, are companies that work with SQL Server, but don’t hire a DBA. Have you ever worked for a company that work with Oracle? Every single company that works with Oracle, has a dedicated Oracle DBA. But have you ever wondered why that isn’t the case when a company works with SQL Server?

Thinking about it, I guess this is because a successful SQL Server installation is only a few “Next, Next, Finish”-mouse clicks away. So if the installation is so easy, every developer or person with IT experience can administer it probably. They couldn’t be more wrong. You know that, I know that, every SQL Server professional knows that, but try to convince other people of that fact.

So the worst bet you can place, and this is how I write myself back to the subject of this month, is not hiring a professional to manage your data and data stores. You wouldn’t let your local baker fix your car, because the wrote some books about cars, right? So why do you let a developer with basic knowledge near your SQL Server? Just because real DBA’s cost money? Yes, we do cost some serious money. But in the end, at least when you hire a GOOD DBA, they will make you money. You don’t think so? What does a DBA cost per hour? And how much money do you lose when your servers are down for just an hour?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 53 other followers