T-SQL Tuesday #44 – The second chance

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “The second chance”. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Bradley Ball (Blog | @SQLBalls).



 
This months topic isn’t easy for me. Even while I’m writing this, I’m still thinking about what that means to me personally. Second chances sound to good to be true. Doing something for a second time, and trying a different approach then the first time, in order to succeed…

Normally I try not to be a person that looks back at previous mistakes, but sometimes that’s easier said than done. But I must say, there are not a lot of things I regret in my life. Only one that’s really close to my heart, and nobody probably knows about. But I won’t bother you with that story…

 
Deserving a second chance
People always say: everybody deserves a second chance. But I don’t completely agree with that. Everyone makes mistakes, and that’s not something to be ashamed of. But if you make the same mistake twice, you need to start wondering if there’s something you could have done to prevent it. But even then, you deserve a second chance.

The people that actually know me, know I’m a nice guy, I’m honest (sometimes even a little bit too honest), and normally you can’t get me angry. But if you screw the same things up over and over again, I’m not that friendly anymore. Let me explain that with an example.

 
No, that wasn’t me!
A while ago I worked with someone who thought he was really good at his job. Personally, I had some issues with that opinion, but I gave him the benefit of the doubt. On a number of occasions he screwed things up, and I thought he should have known that what he was doing was never ever going to work. But still, I was willing to give him that second chance. But then he got me angry. And you won’t like me when I’m angry.

There were a number of SQL Server Agent Jobs running, and they locked up some of our tables and databases. When I asked him to look at that, he said he didn’t run those jobs, and focused on his screen again. So I asked him again, nicely, to look at it. He replied with the same answer.

A little bit angry, I told him the jobs were started on the server, and that he was the only one that was logged on to the server. Then he “suddenly” remembered he started the jobs, and said the locking wasn’t that bad. As a DBA, I took a deep breath, and counted to 10, and waited for him to fix the issue. But if you’re that stubborn, you’re clearly lying to me, and don’t even have the courage to tell me you screwed up, you don’t deserve a second chance in my opinion. At least be honest with yourself and to your colleagues!

 
Honesty get’s you a second chance
At this and previous companies I worked for, I always tried to teach the student and interns they need to be honest and listen to people with experience. Even if things go wrong, and you’re the one to blame, at least tell the truth. For me, that’s the difference between fixing the issue together and moving on, or letting him take the fall all on his own. But this is also an experience I got handed down to me by my colleagues a few years back. This is what happened to me, as I remember it:

When I started my first job in IT, I was offered a job as SQL Server Consultant. That meant that I was responsible for data conversions from different systems to our core system. When I took the job, I had never written a query before. But by listening to colleagues and my mentor (a good friend of mine who worked for the same company), I made it into a development team about 1.5 years after I started my first job.

That meant I was able to access the production system (yes, that’s where the problems began!). These permission were given to me, so I could solve data related issues in production. Until the day they asked me to update 5 rows in production. I checked and double checked the T-SQL statement I wrote, asked a colleague to take a look at it, and then took a break away from my computer so I could totally focus on this task when I got back.

I sat down again, looked at the query one last time, and pressed F5… One minute passed… Two minutes passed… And then the query finished… 50.000 rows affected… I slightly panicked, and noticed I only selected the update, a half “WHERE” clause, and no “BEGIN TRAN”… My heart started racing, and I picked up the phone and asked the system administrator (a good friend of mine, who worked at a different location) if he could restore the last backup for me, because I screwed up. After some questions, and some explanations about my mistake, the last thing he said, before he hung up the phone in anger, was “Which backup? The one that didn’t ran for the last few weeks?”.

I didn’t know what to do. How could I ever fix this? Almost every record in the table was updated, and there was no way of knowing what he old values of the updated records were. So it took all my courage to pick up the phone, and ring the system administrator again. All I heard on the other side of the phone was his evil laughter. Before I could ask him what was going on, he told me: “I’m glad you were honest to me. But don’t worry, I’m restoring the backup that was taken an hour ago. There’s no data lost”.

At that moment, I didn’t know what to think or feel. At first I wanted to slap him silly, but a few minutes later I wanted to thank him for his wonderful help. He probably saved my ass, and he never told anyone except my mentor (who also was my direct manager back then, and also a good friend of us both). A few days later, the three of us talked about it face to face, and eventually all laughed about the situation.

 
A wise lesson
But if I learned anything from that situation, besides never running an update without transaction or “WHERE” clause, is to be honest. Even though you might think the company will fire you for the mistake you made, it’s always better to tell them then letting them find out themselves. And that’s what I try to tell the students, interns, and junior colleagues I work with. Be honest, and then you earn a second chance…

One Response to T-SQL Tuesday #44 – The second chance

  1. Bradley Ball says:

    Nice post Jeff Thanks for contributing! I agree honesty is always the best policy especially when your the one messing up!

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