T-SQL Tuesday #50 – Automation: yea or nay

T-SQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party, that is started by Adam Machanic (Blog | @AdamMachanic). Each month a blog will host the party, and everyone that want’s to can write a blog about a specific subject.

This month the subject is “Automation”. If you want to read the opening post, please click the image below to go to the party-starter: Hemanth D. (Blog | @SqlChow).



 
Being a DBA, you want to automate as many processes as you can, in order to save time that you can spend on more important things. But have you ever considered over-automating your processes?

 
We’re safe! What can go wrong here?
At one of the companies I worked for, they thought they had everything sorted out. Indexes were rebuild every day or every week (depended on the database), databases and logfiles were shrinked, databases were checked for corruption, backups were running, etc. They felt safe, knowing that if something happened they could anticipate on any situation SQL Server would throw at them. It would blow up in their faces eventually…

One of the first things I checked were the backups. The backup job was running, but only a few databases were actually selected for backup. And the biggest database (500+ GB), which was pretty important, was skipped because it took too long to backup. And guess what, they didn’t EVER test recovering from a backup, because of a lack of disk space and time. And there you have it: a false sense of safety!

I don’t have to tell you not to shrink your database and logfiles. Everybody knows that every time you shrink your database, a kitten dies… Or an index dies… Or the soul of your database… I’m not sure which one, but take your pick. It causes (and I quote Paul Randal (Blog | @PaulRandal) on this!): “*massive* index fragmentation”. Read more about that over at Paul’s blog. Besides that, if your next query needs more space in a data- or logfile you'll see more wait time because of file growth.

The indexes were rebuild every night on the important databases, and every weekend on less used databases. But they never checked if the problem they had before was fixed when switching to this solution.

Also the corruption check was run only on user databases. They never heard of running a corruption check on system databases. The system database were in the backup process, but they never took the time checked if they could restore them or were running a backup of a corrupted database.

 
Focus on the important stuff
So instead of automating all your processes, maybe you should focus on what’s really important. You just automated your backup process. But does it run every time? Are the backups actually written to disk? Can you restore one of the backups you created?

What I’m trying to say is, you can automate tasks whenever and wherever you like, but don’t forget to test them. Once you’ve automated something, plan regular tests to verify if the automated process runs the way you expect it to. And is the end result really the result you want and expect?

 
Don’t reinvent the wheel
Another tip is: don’t reinvent the wheel. There are more people that encountered the same issue, and wrote about it or logged about a solution. So before you build your own maintenance solution, or automate health status reports, check with your community members. There’s can be found help for every problem, but the checkup on that solution is all on you.

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