SSRS Reporting automation with .NET

This article was recently published on dev.getroadmap.com in 2 separate posts:
SSRS Reporting automation with .NET
Application Authentication via https using NTLM:

 

SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) is a great way to create an overview or analysis of your data, that you can share with other people as a report. But what if you have a report that you need to share with a large group of people, but they need it with 50 different parameters (like CustomerID for example), and they want to receive it in Excel or PDF? Are you manually going to execute the report with 50 different parameters, export them to the specific file format, and email those files? I don’t think so. Automating this process is easy if you write a small tool for this, and if you use the “Report Server Web Service URL”.

 
ReportServers vs Reports
Before we’re diving into the .NET code, first let’s see what the difference is between the URL’s “http:// [servername] :80/ReportServer” and “http:// [servername] :80/Reports”. If you navigate to your SSRS server, you’ll be redirected to “http:// [servername] :80/Reports”. This is the default webinterface that you use to open reports, manage subscriptions, etc:

 
If you go to “http:// [servername] :80/ReportServer”, you’ll end up in the webservice of SSRS. This allows you to open reports, and as a bonus: add parameters to your http request, so you can automatically execute reports from a URL. This is also called the “SSRS Virtual Directory”:

 
Building a URL
Now that we know that we need to use the webservice, we can start building our URL. First, let’s start with the base-URL. I’ve created a folder in SSRS called “Test”, and a report called “TestReport”. So the base-URL will be: “http:// [servername] :80/ReportServer/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?%2fTest%2fTestReport”. And because my report has 2 date-parameters (From and To), I need to add these to the URL: “&From=2015-12-01&To=2015-12-08”.

This URL doesn’t run the report yet, until you add the command for that to the URL: “&rs:Command=Render”. So your complete URL will look like: “http:// [servername] :80/ReportServer/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?%2fTest%2fTestReport&From=2015-12-01&To=2015-12-08&rs:Command=Render”

One thing to keep in mind is that you need to add the dates in the URL in the correct format (yyyy-MM-dd). If you don’t do that, SSRS will throw an exception.

 
Where to find these URL’s
If you log on to your SSRS server, you can start the “Reporting Services Configuration Manager”. This is the configuration tool for your SSRS instance.

In this tool you can configure both the webinterface URL:

 
And the virtual directory:

 
Text parameter in URL
But SSRS can also have text-fields as input for your report. These can also be added to the URL. Just like the parameters above, you just add the parameter name and value to the URL: “http:// [servername] :80/ReportServer/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?%2fTest%2fTestReport&From=2015-12-01&To=2015-12-08&FreeText=This is a test…&rs:Command=Render”.

After some testing I’ve found out that you can use any character in the text parameter you want to, except for the &-sign. If you use that, SSRS will think it’s a parameter or command and won’t accept the URL. And there’s also the (browser) limitation of the URL length. Testing proves that the limit is 7926-7931 characters. If your URL is below 7926 characters, it works like a charm. If you go above that (between 7926 and 7931) the behavior of SSRS gets buggy, and above 7931 characters SSRS will throw an exception.

 
Export to file
Exporting your report to file can also be added to the URL. By adding “&rs:Format=EXCEL” to the end of the URL tells SSRS to export your report to Excel: “http:// [servername] :80/ReportServer/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?%2fTest%2fTestReport&From=2015-12-01&To=2015-12-08&FreeText=This is a test…&rs:Command=Render&rs:Format=EXCEL”.

This output can be used to automatically store this file on disk or email it with a .NET application.

 
Export formats
There are several export formats in the webinterface of SSRS:

 
The available output formats depend on the version of SSRS you’re using. In SQL Server 2016 you have all the same export formats as you have in SQL Server 2014, but they added PowerPoint to that list.

 
Creating the application
To automatically download an exported report, I’ve created a “Windows Forms Application”. In this applications we need to do 3 things:

– Determine variable values
– Build a URL
– Download/Export the report

To determine the variable values, I added 2 “DateTimePickers”to the form, and a “TextBox” for the CustomerID. Other than that, there are 2 buttons: 1 to get the URL (might come in handy for testing), and 1 to export the report in the selected format. There’s also a “TextBox” so that you can configure the drop-folder for the files:

 
Build URL
In order to build the URL we need 5 pieces:

– The SSRS servername or URL
– The folder of the report (if it’s not in the root)
– The report name
– The parameters needed for executing the report
– The export format

In my case the folder (“Test”) and report name (“SSRSAutomationTestReport”) are known, so I hard-coded them:

string ReportServer = 
    "http://"
    + ReportServerURL
    + "/ReportServer/Pages/ReportViewer.aspx?%2fTest%2fSSRSAutomationTestReport"
    + "&From="
    + DT_From.Value.Date.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd")
    + "&To="
    + DT_To.Value.Date.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd")
    + "&CustomerID="
    + TB_CustomerID.Text
    + "&rs:Command=Render";

if (RB_Excel.Checked)
{
    ReportServer += "&rs:Format=EXCEL";
}

if (RB_PDF.Checked)
{
    ReportServer += "&rs:Format=PDF";
}

 
This results in the URL that you can use to export the report to a specific file format (in my case either Excel or PDF).

Download the file
To download the file we need to use the “CredentialCache”, because when you use the SSRS webservice to execute a report, an NTLM challenge takes place. The “CredentialCache” will solve the 2-step authentication for you. After that, you can use “WebClient” to download the file. This will look like this:

var url = new Uri(ReportURL);

string FileExtension = ".pdf";

if (RB_Excel.Checked)
    FileExtension = ".xls";

var location = TB_Dropfolder.Text + "SSRSAutomationTestReport - Customer " + TB_CustomerID.Text + FileExtension;

// When calling for the url a NTLM challenge takes place
// Once this challenge takes place the GetCredentials will automagically be called via de CredentialCache
// This will resolve the 2 step authentication
// Requirement: the uri for the cache must be the Scheme + Host of the domain
var cc = new CredentialCache();
cc.Add(new Uri(string.Format("{0}://{1}", url.Scheme, url.Host)), "NTLM", new NetworkCredential(Username, Password, Domain));

using (var client = new WebClient())
{
    client.Credentials = cc;
    client.DownloadFile(url, location);

    MessageBox.Show("Report is exported");
}

 
Download the resources
To show you how I solved this, I’ve made the resources available for download. You can download the SSRS report here, and the Windows Forms application here.

Please feel free to download them, try them out for yourself, and let me know what you think.

2 Responses to SSRS Reporting automation with .NET

  1. Pingback: SSRS Report Automation – Curated SQL

  2. gismcieri says:

    Thanks for getting me started. You saved me hours. I took the download report code and moved it into a console app with a URL parameter. I had already created a python app to do a bunch of things and generate the URL. I have downloaded pdfs with python many times but the authentication was holding me up.

    Thanks for the great tutorial.

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